Rhythm & Muse : It’s been Ekphrastic

Rhythm and Muse has its final evening of poetry and music tonight, at the Ram Jam club in Kingston Upon Thames. I am very sorry to miss it due to other long-standing plans but I will be thinking of them.

The Grey Horse pub, which the Ram Jam club is part of, is going to be under new ownership from January 2015, so this will be the last regular Rhythm and Muse event for a while. But it won’t be the end of R&M, and there may be festival specials and other goodies to look forward to- the advice is to check the website and facebook for updates.

If you can go tonight I would urge you to do so. Apart from the terrific lineup, including the inimitable LiTTLe MACHiNe, who Carol Ann Duffy declares are ‘The most brilliant music and poetry band I’ve seen in decades’ (see below), there will be plenty of festive cheer. If you are very lucky you may even get to witness the on-the-spot poetry of Nick Poole- once witnessed, never to be forgotten! Most of all, I can guarantee you will have lots of fun.

I found out about Rhythm and Muse while I was a student at Kingston University, and soon went along to experience the delights on offer. I found a dynamic mix of musical acts and excellent poets performing in a small, ram-jam packed venue. I have witnessed some great poetry at R&M, from the likes of Roger McGough, Martin Daws, Mario Petrucci, A F Harrold, Katrina Naomi and many many others – you can see the full list here.

One of the best things about R&M is its enthusiastic and loyal audience, who were also willing to listen to anyone who was brave enough to sign up  for an open mic spot. I’ve read my work many times, and benefitted from the friendly and supportive atmosphere. I took part in the legendary R&M Slam, writing a poem written especially for the occasion, which has become a staple of many of my readings since. The open mic at R&M in particular has been very important in helping me to gain confidence and find my voice as a poet, and I am very grateful for it.

I was at Rhythm and Muse’s night at The Rose Theatre, where I was lucky enough to see John Cooper Clarke, and, afterwards, to see my review of the show published and syndicated through the local press.

R&M’s longstanding relationship with Kingston University has seen them organise creative writing workshops at the Stanley Picker Gallery, of which I am fortunate enough to have attended a couple. One of these bore fruit in the form of a whole R&M night devoted to the poems and writings which were inspired by The Liquid Game, Boudicca’s incredible installation in the gallery, earlier this year.

Kingston Writing School has held events with R&M on campus, and many of my peers who studied creative writing at Kingston University have read their poems at Rhythm and Muse open mic, and students I have taught have carried on the tradition.

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A massive Congratulations to Alison Hill, Alice Thurling, Nick Poole, Judith Watts and everyone who has helped to make Rhythm and Muse such a success and such an important part of the creative life of us local poets and writers. It will be missed. Thank you!

 

 

Out-of-body-in-the-flesh: Seeing Coil Play Live 10 years ago

At the time I was still married, still living in Bristol, living a completely different life to the one I have now. Since 2002 I’d been on a path of re-discovery, of working out why I was feeling so out of sync with myself. There were lots of reasons…seeing Coil was another piece of the puzzle falling into place, if you’ll forgive the cliche.

I’m not sure when I first heard Coil- it was some time in the late eighties, and it was probably ‘S is for Sleep’ from The Elephant Table LP, which my boyfriend of the time had.

I remember him coming home with the Horse Rotovator LP and it changed everything, and profoundly influenced our own music-making and thinking. After that we bought all the Coil music we could. I still have my vinyl copies of Scatology, the Hellraiser themes and a signed copy of Windowpane, amongst other Coil goodies, all stashed in the loft, waiting for the time when I eventually have space for them again. I’m not a completist and apart from a few bits and bobs on cd I don’t have many of the recording they went on to make in the nineties and early noughties. Besides, my life changed and I was no longer making music, although I was still being creative in other ways from time to time.

Hearing Coil play live was something I never thought I would get the opportunity to do, to see them performing out-of-body-in-the-flesh.

The closest I got to meeting them was years before, when I wore my John Crancher shirt, emblazoned with gold devils, to a gig we were all at, maybe Meat Beat Manifesto, and they had joked that they wouldn’t release their next record until I gave it to them (I didn’t) …

They played the Ocean in Hackney, long since gone, on what I remember as a hot and dusty Sunday evening. Where my ex was desperate to leave by the end of the gig, I was desperate to stay to the very last, even after they’d finished, and ‘Feed the Birds’ from Mary Poppins was blaring out of the PA. I’m very thankful I got to see Jhonn and Sleazy play live- it was as beautiful, disconcerting and transporting as I had hoped it would be. RIP.

Magick moments.

(The Quietus wrote a great piece on Coil in 2011 to honour the first anniversary of Peter Christopherson’s (aka Sleazy) passing. Find it here)

 

 

 

Cross Bones Graveyard, Southwark

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“… a pauper’s burial ground, with a legend going back to medieval times…”

But that’s not the half of it- not even the beginning… more on this to come in another post. Please click the link above to find out more about this place, in the heart of South London, just off Borough High Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIP Maya Angelou #StillIRise

Aren’t we lucky to have had Maya Angelou in our midst, blessing us with her poetry, her life…what a trove she leaves us with.

Here Comes The Sun #HappySolstice

Inward, under
rent asunder
light is returning
bringing morning
new hope, new dreams
which path to take
decisions to make
dark protected us
mulched us, gave us
cover, sustenance
ready for rebirth.
Here comes the sun.

Happy Solstice!

<originally published on the old LucyFurLeaps blog 21/12/08>

Club to Catwalk at the V&A

VandA1editA night out at the V&A to raise a glass for my best mate’s birthday, take a trip down memory lane at the Club to Catwalk show, and do a spot of dressing up in vintage 80s fashion. Perfect!

My best mate Mel and sister Tania both turned up in their John Crancher skirts. I had intended to wear my black John Crancher shirt, decorated with the same distinctive print of generously-endowed dancing devils in gold, but after two forays into the loft couldn’t find it. Instead, I opted for my skull shirt from Artificial Eye, an infamous label in the long-gone but still missed Kensington Market.

L’Anarchie, John Crancher’s shop was also in Kenny Market, and although none of us could remember much about the shop itself, apart from the fabulous clothing, we did remember where it was (ground floor on the left hand side).

The show had some interesting exhibits, especially the section upstairs with its Body Map, Rifat Ozbek, Pam Hogg, Vivienne Westwood designs and outfits worn by Adam Ant and Toyah. As an old Goth I found the ‘Gothic’ section a bit staid and sanitised, and the exhibition as a whole felt too static, despite the excellent video montages and soundtrack. It didn’t achieve the edginess, experimentation and exuberance of that time,which the recent ICA Subcultures show had in buckets but it does have the actual clothes!

Unlike the ICA show the V&A were strictly enforcing their policy of no photography, or even sketching of the show. Understandable – you will have to go to see what I am talking about, and as I didn’t take a notebook I can’t rattle off a comprehensive list of designers.

The sign of a good show is that your expectations are confounded in some way, and what the three of us had forgotten, apart from the stereotype of legwarmers and day glo etc (yawn) is that there were a lot of BAD CLOTHES in the 80s- terrible jumpers, ruched shiny cocktail dresses, overblown detailing and questionable tailoring. We had a good laugh about the reality…it’s amazing what the memory filters out.

If you went to Kensington Market, then crossed the road to window shop in Hyper Hyper, or hung out in the Great Gear Market, this show will interest and delight you. Also- I’d never experienced the V&A on a Friday evening and would recommend it- the atmosphere in the museum was great, and the addition of a bar and dj definitely helped!