Blossom to Fruit Writing Workshop at Kingston Environment Centre, 4th March 2017

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As part of Apple Day at Kingston Environment Centre, on Saturday 4th March, I will be doing this!

Blossom to Fruit: A writing workshop to explore our relationship with fruit and trees, their histories and our memories…

Write about your favourite pear tree, your grandma’s apple pie, be inspired by our local history of orchards and fruit-growing; is there a particular variety of apple you would like to pay homage to? We will explore all these possibilities and more at the start of Kingston Environment Centre’s Apple Day.

£10 per place-  this will be a donation towards raising funds for a leaflet about the Borough’s Apple Story. More about Alison’s fundraising here. This is an important part of our local heritage and I am hoping we can help Alison achieve her aim by having fun writing about our relationships with fruit and trees!

12 places available- please book in advance to secure your place!

Lucy 07859997617 or Alison 07867507086

Time: 10.30-12 midday

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this is a picture of my Dad telling me stories about crab apples…

 

Please come! This will be the start of a wonderful day of apple and orchard related talks and activities.

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The Nonsuch Poems by Bernard Jacobs

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The Nonsuch Poems by Bernard Jacobs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In January 2015 I went to speak about my writing, especially the poetry maps, Amniotic City, and the then still-in-development Over the Fields, at Sutton Writers. I met Bernard Jacobs after my talk, a local writer, who was inspired to write poems about Nonsuch Park, near to where he lives in Surrey.

The Park, originally much larger than it is now, was created in 1538 by Henry VIII to celebrate the 30th year of his accession and the birth of his son, the future Edward VI. It came very close to ‘Over the Fields’ territory, and there is a possibility that Henry hunted across the land that I have been exploring in my new map. James I certainly laid claim to some of it during his reign.

It has been great to hear of Bernard’s progress with this project, and now to see it published. This lovely book is the result. It is a mixture of fine poems, each written in a different form, and the historical context of each, providing readers with both a creative and historical narrative about this fascinating place.

I am going to take my copy to Nonsuch Park and read it again in situ.

 

Cherish Your Churchyards Week! And Poems about Carshalton…

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Apparently it is Cherish Your Churchyards week– the things I find out from BBC Springwatch… It is and here are some of the reasons why we should Cherish Our Churchyards…

  • They often contain a rich diversity of plant and animal life.
  • They are important places for archaeology and history.
  • They often have distinctive and veteran trees.
  • The stonework and boundary walls provide a home for a mosaic of mosses, ferns and lichens.
  • They provide a tranquil place for quiet reflection.
  • They are a resource for inspiration and community learning.

Recently I went for a walk through All Saints Churchyard in Carshalton, with a couple of writer friends, Neil Horabin and David Russomano, as part of a drift around the village after work last Tuesday.

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We are currently writing poetry about this historic town and its connection with water, for a poetry event at The Carshalton On Sea festival, which takes place from Friday 19th- Sunday 21st June.grave2

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The Water Poets event takes place at the Cryer Theatre, Carshalton, on Saturday 20th June from 12-1pm, and is FREE!

I will be posting some photos and writing about Carshalton in the run up to the festival.

Cultural Histories at Kingston double feature: That’s not how I remember it

???????????????????????????????This Thursday, 18th December, I will be speaking with Dr Alison Baverstock, as part of a Cultural Histories at Kingston University double feature, titled: “That’s not how I remember it.”

Dr Baverstock, associate professor of publishing at Kingston University, will be speaking about her extensive research into self-publishing and in particular the processes of externalising the internal, and how this impacts on both writer and those offering associated publishing services. She has recently written an ebook for The Guardian about how to negotiate highly personal writing projects – and what to do with them once you have finished. Should they be shared or left in a drawer for others to discover in future?

I will be speaking the effect that place has on us; in particular how where you grow up affects you at the time – and impacts on your life in future. I will also talk about the writing of memoirs in relation to place and the memories we hold, and offer a scholarly analysis of how other writers have approached and handled these issues.

Full details of the event here.

Oh the places you (might) go

I am drafting poems for my MFA dissertation. The general theme is place, as with most of my writing in recent years. This week I have been transported to France, Italy, Germany, Ethiopa and am currently visiting the Cherokee Nation. It’s cheaper (and more fun) than flying. Some of this ‘mental travel’ is to revisit places I have already been to, some of it is vicarious, via maps and online resources…some of it is imaginary/visionary.

I’ve been reading William Blake’s The Mental Traveller this morning, seeing as I am on this strange journey with my poems- although the subject matter would seem to be more mental travail than travel…it is, like all his work, thought-provoking, beautiful, troubling and magickal:

And these are the gems of the human soul:
The rubies and pearls of a lovesick eye,
The countless gold of an aching heart,
The martyr’s groan, and the lover’s sigh.