Tolworth Treasure & The Hogsmill Hum

FREE Walks and Workshops for 2018 with Alison Fure and Lucy Furlong

Walk the Hogsmill River and explore the green fields of Tolworth. Experience the wildlife, learn about the environment, discover the hidden heritage.

Please ‘like’ and follow the facebook page www.facebook.com/tolworthtreasure for more information and updates about events

WALK THE HOGSMILL

First walk of the year: Saturday 20th January, 11am-2pm

Come and see the oldest tree along the river!

The Hogsmill at Ewell Court, January 2018

We will meet at the white cycle bridge, at the confluence of the Hogsmill River and Bonesgate stream. This can be found off the A240, Kingston Road, Tolworth, just on the boundary with Epsom and Ewell.

Walking along the Hogsmill River towards Ewell we will have  time to stop and talk, and take photos. Please join us afterwards for tea, chat and a chance to write at Bourne Hall cafe at the end of the walk.

Please note this is a linear walk. It will take approximately two hours, so allow an additional hour in the café as well as time to get home. From Bourne Hall it is easy to catch a bus back to Tolworth / Surbiton / Kingston, or jump on a train at West Ewell station, which is nearby.

We will walk along the river, through fields and woodland, up to where the oldest tree in the borough of Epsom and Ewell, and onto the Hogsmill springs near Bourne Hall.

Alison will talk about what happens when two rivers meet and about the ecology of the area. On the way we are likely to see and will look out for: kingfishers, little egrets, various types of fungus including ‘ear fungus’; the eggs of the brown hairstreak butterfly, discuss the importance of yellow meadow ant mounds and much more!

Lucy will talk about how you can experience this walk from a creative perspective, and about some of the famous artists who were inspired by this landscape. There will be a chance to take part in some brief writing activities at the end, if you would like to.

It may be muddy and slippery so please wear stout footwear, bring water and a snack to share on the way. This walk is not suitable for young children – over 12’s are welcome- and there will be other walks coming up which will have a family focus. Facebook event here.

Disclaimer- all walks undertaken at the participants’ own risk and responsibility. Please contact for further information and regarding accessibility and mobility.

 

 

Tolworth Treasure

Tolworth Court Farm Fields

What kind of Five Year Plan should Tolworth have? I would like to see a commitment to keep and manage its green spaces sensitively – because they are what make Tolworth special.

I was shocked to hear Tolworth referred to as a ‘ghetto’ by staff and students at Kingston University while I was studying there. It is one of the oldest parts of the Borough- with ancient and deep historical roots. There are the remains of a medieval moated manor at Tolworth Court, where Kingston Biodiversity Network holds open days. Tolworth Court Farm Fields is a wonderful wild treasure, which should stay that way.

Can you spot Tolworth Tower?

Alison Fure, a local ecologist, has been taking people on Apple Walks, fascinating insights into the history of orchards and fruit growing in this part of the borough. This includes the Tolworth Apple Store, an important piece of local heritage, which she is campaigning to protect.

Buy Alison’s chap book here.

On the borders of Tolworth is the Hogsmill Valley, where Millais painted the backdrop to his painting Ophelia, something I have written about in my poetry map, Over the Fields, an exploration of four generations of my family’s relationship with the greenbelt, which is at the end of the Sunray Estate, towards Malden Manor.

photograph by Bill Mudge

The other day, on my regular morning run down Old Kingston Road, I got to the bridge over the Hogsmill and stopped, to see a flash of iridescent blue zoom downstream: a kingfisher (click the link for a lovely video on the RSPB web site!). It’s not such a rare sight, if you stop there regularly, and look in the right direction, away from the traffic.

Tolworth is remarkable for its open green spaces, and we have a choice now- do we value them, and protect them, recognising them as our lungs and our unique heritage, or do we lose them and become more urban, more polluted and a lot less interesting?

(This article originally appeared in the ‘Tolworth Observer’ a newspaper produced as part of the public consultation on the draft Tolworth Area Plan. For more information see the Kingston Borough Council web site here.)

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Harvesting A Map, Over the Fields

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A small band of friends and family took a walk Over the Fields yesterday, to help me harvest the new poetry map. A glorious late September afternoon, close to the Autumn Equinox, traditionally associated with the second harvest…perfect timing.
We met at the church and were greeted by the vicar, Kevin, who was very generous in allowing us to wander around the beautiful church that is in his care, even letting Techno the Great Dane have a nose inside, and letting the children have a go on the church organ.

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We rambled down the hill into the valley; along paths, over and under bridges, by the river and through fields, stopping at various points to read poems. Thank you to Dad’s friend Roger White, who grew up and played in the fields too. He read us two pieces of writing he had published back in 1960, which was a great addition to the occasion. One about the Hogsmill River, published in his school magazine, and the other, a small clipping from the Surrey Comet, a news story about a local ‘incident’, which took place in 1959…

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Thank you to the family and friends who have helped me to make this new map, and who have been so kind and generous with their time, skills and support. Thanks to Bill Mudge, who recently took photos of me over the fields as I was finishing the map and taking a last walk there before signing off the final proof at my friend Mel’s studio. (Mega thanks to Mel- the map wouldn’t exist without her) Bill has kindly allowed me to use his photos, and a couple of them are on my web site. You can find more of Bill’s work here – the photos of me and Mel are part of his project 20 in 15.
The map is officially ready to find its way into the world, and with a bit of luck will help people wend their way around this patch of ‘green’…maybe you will be one of them…?
You can buy the Over the Fields map HERE, right now, and the first 25 people to order one will also get a FREE limited edition postcard (1 of 50) with a brand new poem which is also connected to this area, but not on the map… Your journey begins here!
There may be other walks – please ‘like’ my Facebook page for updates.

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Re-Visioning KTWN

This morning I attended Our Kingston Our Future, held in a large marquee at the parish chuch in the centre of Kingston Upon Thames. The event which takes place over this weekend is being run by ArtGym in conjunction with Transition Towns Kingston. It is being billed as a re-visioning of Kingston Upon Thames, a chance for two discreet generations of local residents, 19-25 year-olds and the over-55s, to come together and swap stories and experiences about living in Kingston.

These stories will be expressed using the creative arts and the resulting ideas used by Transition Towns Kingston in their future projects. The artworks are to be displayed in Kingston Museum during June and July. A documentary of the event is being made which will also be shown at the museum and the International Youth Arts Festival, taking place in July.

I found out about the event after members of ArtGym came to my university to recruit students to act as ‘creative ambassadors’ on the day, and although I don’t fit either age criteria, they were keen to sign me up as a poet.

I went to the opening workshop which was a great mix of ages, cultures and experiences and had a great time making some 3d art in the ‘river’ zone, with a partner who turned out to be someone I had had email contact with but never met. A nice bit of serendipity! I then enjoyed translating people’s experiences and stories about Kingston in the ‘forest’ zone.

Everyone seemed to enjoy the event and some great art work was produced in a short space of time. There was a lovely atmosphere, and even a spot of spontaneous dancing at the end of the workshop! I wish I could see the marquee at the end of tomorrow- I am sure there will be a material wealth of art to show for the stories and hopes people have of Kingston. And it is a big, green, postive vibe in the middle of town. Great to see in a place which is nowadays known mainly for shopping but which has a long heritage and some hidden gems.

At the end of the workshop I read two of my poems (see below) which were well received. I wasn’t completely sure what role I was supposed to play during the event, part attender part creative artist I think (?) but hope I helped in some way. I really enjoyed it and, although nervous,  felt pleased with my reading of the poems. I took notes while I was there, and along with the historical research I’ve been doing, and my own experiences, I think I will write more ‘Kingston’ poems.

Sense of place is becoming an important, possibly the most important part of my poetry.

Three fish

Shop and shop until you drop in Kingston

STOP

Past and present are on the hook: future

LOOK

Three fat chubb glistening in the Hogsmill

LISTEN

How stories shape and link us to a place

THINK

Chubb at Clattern Bridge

Three fish silent and steady in the flow

Three fish at a crossing in the river

In sight of the Kings Stone

Both ancient and  grey

The deep past is still here in Kingston